Pine Meadow Ranch Center for Arts & Agriculture

Stewardship

We aim to improve the health and well-being of people and place by:

  • Leveraging multiple, diverse perspectives to support the long-term resilience of this ecosystem and its people, including the many ways that indigenous people continue to shape, create and care for these lands.

  • Engaging students, artists, and community members across generations and with a diversity of lived experiences to explore the interconnection of agricultural practices and land stewardship.

  • Carrying out ecologically and economically resilient activities in order to facilitate their development, replication and implementation in local rural and tribal communities.

  • Joining forces with educators, researchers, tribes and nonprofits partners who bring multiple, diverse perspectives to study our interaction with a biodiverse landscape.

  • Grounding our work, caring for and sharing our region’s cultural, historic, and natural resources in a strong sense of place and community.

This high desert region is the traditional territory of the Wasco, Warm Springs, and Paiute peoples. Today, Warm Springs Country is home to a thriving community recognized as the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. As we work to support the long-term resilience of this ecosystem and its people, we recognize the many ways that indigenous people continue to shape, create, and care for these lands.

Whychus Creek flows through
Pine Meadow Ranch

In the mid-2010’s, Dorro Sokol, the original owner of Pine Meadow Ranch, was an integral partner in the restoration of Whychus Creek. The restoration effort was supported by our grant partner, the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council, and included the removal of a dam from Whychus Creek.